Building Oregon

Harry F. Wentz Bungalow and Studio (Manzanita, Oregon)

Harry
Title
Harry F. Wentz Bungalow and Studio (Manzanita, Oregon)
LC Subject
Architecture, American Architecture--United States
Alternative
Harry F. Wentz House (Manzanita, Oregon)
Creator
Doyle, Albert E. A. E. Doyle & Associates
Creator Display
Albert Ernest Doyle (architect, 1877-1928) A. E. Doyle & Associates (architecture firm, 1915-1928)
Description
National Register of Historic Places (Listed, 1976)
View
information record placeholder pending image
Provenance
Design Library, University of Oregon Libraries
Temporal
1910-1919
Style Period
Northwest Regional
Work Type
architecture (object genre) built works views (visual works) exterior views dwellings houses
Location
Manzanita >> Tillamook County >> Oregon >> West >> United States Neahkahnie Beach Tillamook County >> Oregon >> West >> United States Oregon >> West >> United States United States
Street Address
north of Manzanita off U. S. 101
Date
1916
Identifier
default.jpg
Rights
Educational Use Permitted
Source
Gift of Philip Dole
Type
Image
Format
image/jpeg
Material
weatherboard, log
Set
Building Oregon
Primary Set
Building Oregon
Institution
University of Oregon
Note
The Harry F. Wentz cottage is sited comfortably on a bluff overlooking the Pacific Ocean at Neahkahnie between Tillamook and Seaside on the Oregon Coast. Termed a "Studio-Bungalow" when it was built in 1916, it was designed by the noted Portland architect A. E. Doyle and an equally noted artist friend, Harry F. Wentz, and has since come to be regarded as the prototype for the Northwest style of architecture developed in Oregon in the 1930s and 40s. The cottage was built by Wentz and a local builder named Hurnke. Harry F. Wentz was a noted Pacific Northwest artist and teacher. His paintings were of subjects from nature, mountains and forests, the sea shore, farms and villages, and the inhabitants of these areas. He taught at the Portland Museum Art School from 1910 to 1941 and was noted for his excellent composition instruction and his philosophy of design. He was a close personal friend of A.E. Doyle, and Pietro Belluschi, who worked with Belluschi after Doyle's death in 1928, spent much time with Wentz during the Depression Years on stretch trips and discussions of design philosophy. It was Belluschi and Yeon who developed the Pacific Northwest School as an identifiable regional style in the late 1930s and 1940s.