Building Oregon

McKenzie Highway Historic District (Linn County, Oregon)

Title
McKenzie Highway Historic District (Linn County, Oregon)
LC Subject
Architecture, American Architecture--United States
Creator
Oregon. Department of Transportation
Creator Display
Oregon Department of Transportation (builder/contractor)
Description
National Register of Historic Places (Listed, 2011)
View
National Register of Historic Places Registration Form. Completed by Judith A. Chapman, M.A., Archaeological Investigations Northwest, Inc.; reviewed and revised by Robert W. Hadlow, Ph.D., Oregon Department of Transportation, August 21, 2009
Temporal
1910-1919 1920-1929
Work Type
architecture (object genre) built works views (visual works) exterior views buildings, transportation open spaces roads
Location
Linn County Lane County >> Oregon >> West >> United States Deschutes County >> Oregon >> West >> United States United States
Date
1917 1924
View Date
2006
Identifier
pna_2
Rights
Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
Rights Holder
University of Oregon
Source
Pacific Coast Architect, March 1913
Type
Image
Format
application/pdf
Set
Building Oregon
Primary Set
Building Oregon
Institution
University of Oregon
Note
The road that would become the McKenzie Highway was first constructed in 1862 as a wagon route across the middle Cascade Mountains to link the Willamette Valley with the Bend area. Recognizing the importance of the route, the Oregon Highway Commission indentified the road as one of five included in the first highway plan in 1914 and subsequently improved the route in 1917. Increasing traffic lead to the construction of a modern highway starting in 1921 and which was finished in 1924. Built by the Forest Service and the US Bureau of Public Roads in Oregon, the McKenzie Highway was specifically designed to encourage tourism by offering motorists sweeping views of forests and mountain and volcanic vistas from McKenzie Pass as they travelled through National Forest lands. Upon completion, the highway carried a large amount of local traffic, as well as tourists from all over the United States, and was known for its scenery and recreational opportunities such as hunting and fishing, hot-spring resorts, hotels, and campgrounds. Seeking to further encourage tourism, the Civilian Conservation Corps constructed the Dee Wright Observatory at the pass in 1935. Constructed of volcanic rock, the building offers visitors breath-taking views of the surrounding mountains and volcanic lava flows. Source: Oregon State Historic Preservation Office.