Building Oregon

Willakenzie Grange Hall (Eugene, Oregon)

Title
Willakenzie Grange Hall (Eugene, Oregon)
LC Subject
Architecture, American Architecture--United States
Alternative
Willakenzie Grange No 498 Halll (Eugene, Oregon)
Creator
Harlow, Frank B. Ayres, William A. Rice, C. A. Calef, Ira Smith, George
Creator Display
George Smith (builder/contractor) Ira Calef (builder/contractor) C. A. Rice (builder/contractor) William A. Ayres (builder/contractor) Frank B. Harlow (builder/contractor)
Description
National Register of Historic Places (Listed, 2009)
View
National Register of Historic Places Registration Form
Provenance
University of Oregon Libraries
Temporal
1910-1919
Style Period
Craftsman (style) vernacular architecture
Work Type
architecture (object genre) built works views (visual works) exterior views societies' buildings granges (fraternal buildings) works, agricultural plans (orthographic projections) floor-plan drawings
Latitude
44.081737
Longitude
-123.061602
Location
Eugene >> Lane County >> Oregon >> Pacific Northwest Lane County >> Oregon >> Pacific Northwest Oregon >> Pacific Northwest United States
Street Address
3055 Willakenzie Road
Date
1913
View Date
2008
Identifier
lane_eugene_willakenzie.pdf
Rights
Educational Use Permitted
Source
Oregon State Historic Preservation Office
Type
Image
Format
application/pdf
Material
wood, shiplap walls; concrete foundation; asphalt shingle roof
Set
Building Oregon
Primary Set
Building Oregon
Institution
University of Oregon
Citation
National Register of Historic Places Nomination Edna A. Scott, The Grange Movement in Oregon: 1873-1900 ( University of Oregon Thesis, 1923).
Note
Built in 1913 as the meeting hall for Willakenzie Grange #498, this vernacular-style building stands as a reminder of the once-dominant agricultural community that occupied the region since its earliest pioneer settlement. The Grange movement began in 1868 as an outlet for farmers to organize around common political, economic, and social interests. The organization spread quickly across the United States and Oregon. Will Ayres and Frank Harlow, both area farmers and sons of early settlers, organized the Grange in 1913 with sixty-four initial members. The group decided on the name Willakenzie, combining the names of the nearby Willamette and McKenzie Rivers. Grange members themselves constructed the building, and once complete it served as an area meeting place. Grange members were active participants in the annual Lane County Fair, voiced concerns about a number of local issues, and established the Producer’s Public Market in 1915, which later became the Lane County Farmers Market. Sou